If you believe “we may be sleepwalking towards a global war” it’s time to wake up

Robert Tombs is a professor emeritus of history at the university of Cambridge and a contributor to mainstream newspapers such as The Telegraph, The Spectator and The Times. He is without doubt a high profile bourgeois historian and has therefore built a career on being an expert at repackaging bourgeois propaganda. His most recent article is no exception, published by The Telegraph on the 31st of December 2021, titled Like in 1914 or 1939, we may be sleepwalking towards a global war that nothing can stop.

Before we begin it’s worth noting that the subtitle there are lessons from previous conflicts that could prevent another from startingcontradicts the title’s thesis that there is nothing that can stop the global war we are sleepwalking towards. The truth is Prof. Tombs does not intend to provide such lessons that might help avert the global war because his career is based upon doing the exact opposite, that is, helping us “sleepwalk” towards it. Continue reading “If you believe “we may be sleepwalking towards a global war” it’s time to wake up”

Photo: AFP

“Memorial” fraudsters rebuffed by the Supreme Court

The belated decision by the Russian Supreme Court to shut down the self-syled “human rights” organization Memorial International will be greeted with relief by all those who draw inspiration from the revolutionary achievements of the Soviet Union and resist attempts to distort the historical record and rob the working class of its own revolutionary history. Continue reading ““Memorial” fraudsters rebuffed by the Supreme Court”

Applebaum's sorrowful harvest

Still Searching For That Soviet ‘Holocaust’

The “Holodomor” is still being pushed by a collection of Anglo nations and Ukrainian ultra-nationalists and fascists. The origin of this legend stems from a famine which occurred in Ukraine and parts of Russia in 1932.

Throughout the 1930s rabid anti-communists and Nazi sympathisers would try to tie the famine to the fault of the Soviet government. This would rapidly evolve to accusations of genocide and a “planned starving of Ukraine by the Soviet government”.

Why the Soviet government would starve parts of Russia, Belarus and Eastern Ukraine to “suppress Ukrainian nationalism” was never explained by the adherents of these lies.

When it was originally pushed back in the 1930s it was done so by Nazi sympathisers like William Randolph Hearst who commanded the formidable ‘Hearst Press’ renowned for it’s “yellow journalism” (or “fake news”).

The Hearst Press faked photos and pretended their journalists had spent a year in Ukraine during that period.

In reality the journalist they sent went for two weeks and never left the Moscow area.

In Douglas Tottles book, Fraud, Famine and Fascism he examined the numerous faked photographs that were first through the Hearst Press and their organs then again in the 1980s alongside Robert Conquest’s  book Harvest of Sorrow. Continue reading “Still Searching For That Soviet ‘Holocaust’”

The Bond Delusion

With a new instalment of the 007 franchise having finally been released after a lengthy covid imposed delay, the fictional spy character became the subject of headlines when it was announced that actor Daniel Craig would be stepping down from the role.

As fans agonised over whether the so called ‘woke’ trend in popular culture would result in the character being recast with a female or black actor in the role, a host of journalists were spurred to pen their own personal affirmations of affection for writer Ian Fleming’s suave, unflappable MI6 agent.

One such article, published in the Times on the 13th November and titled ‘How James Bond beat the Soviet Union’, loosely reviews a recent book by Fleming’s nephew James Fleming, Bond behind the Iron Curtain, which hones in on the role perceived to have been played by the 007 films and books in the ‘culture war’ between the imperialist and socialist camps during the cold war. Continue reading “The Bond Delusion”

Sergei Gerasimov. Kolkhoz Holiday. 1937 Photo by E. Kogan / RIA Novosti; State Tretyakov Gallery

Cool or cold? – Pop Art vs Socialist Realism

An exhibition of art in the Berlin Gropius Bau Museum has led to two reviews in the Western media. One in the New York Times (NYT) and the other in the Forbes Magazine (FM). The exhibition is based on the theme ‘cool and cold’ and includes artworks from the cold war period both western and Soviet. We are sure that the reader has already worked out where the organisers are going with this, Western art = cool and Soviet art = cold.

The narrative of the exhibition is fairly easy to read as is that of the two reviews; that Western artforms are bold and colourful, inspiring and challenging while drab and dreary Soviet art in the officially dictated style of Socialist realism has nothing to say because the artists were not free to express themselves, at least not until the latter days of the Soviet Union when brave underground artists dared to paint in the Western styles of Pop art, abstract expressionism, etc! Continue reading “Cool or cold? – Pop Art vs Socialist Realism”

Guardian dusts off Mr Jones for another round of anti-Soviet lies

In scandalised tones the Guardian claims on the 15th October 2021 that “a group of masked men stormed the offices of a renowned human rights organisation in Moscow on Thursday to disrupt the screening of Mr Jones, a British co-produced film about the Holodomor, the Stalin-era famine that killed millions of peasants in Soviet Ukraine during the 1930s.” This disruption, real or imagined, is seized upon by the Guardian to give another box-office puff to this film’s dreary lies.

Never one to spoil a good anti-communist yarn by such tedious journalistic virtues as sticking to facts or checking sources, the Guardian naturally swallows whole the version of Soviet history touted by the flim’s Polish director Agnieszka Holland. After all, what could be more beguiling than the tale of a plucky Welsh reporter risking his life in order to deliver an eye-witness account of a “genocide” engineered by Stalin in Ukraine? Unfortunately for the Guardian, however, the known facts tell a very different story. Continue reading “Guardian dusts off Mr Jones for another round of anti-Soviet lies”

Slander against Stalin Pointed at Putin – Nato’s Goebbelsian propaganda

A recent article in the Independent, by Ella Glover, titled “Remains of thousands of people believed to be victims of Stalin’s terror discovered in Ukraine“, reveals that a new mass grave has been discovered with “the bones of around 5,000 to 8,000 people” during exploratory works as part of an airport extension. Even though our dear author admits that the victims’ “crimes and identities remain unknown” she expresses no doubt whatsoever as to who was responsible.

Since the Nazis and their fascist counterparts are well known to have committed countless mass executions, especially in Eastern Europe, we should question who these victims were and what lead to their burial before reaching any conclusion about who did it, but this is not how Goebbelsian propaganda works; instead, given the discovery of some bones, the opportunity is jumped upon to make up a story slandering Stalin and Russia with the same brush. According to our author the bones are “thought by historians to belong to victims of Stalin’s Great Terror from 1937 to 1939” but alas, the identities of these historians as well as the depth of their thought remain as unknown to us as the identities and crimes of the victims. Continue reading “Slander against Stalin Pointed at Putin – Nato’s Goebbelsian propaganda”

Daniel Hannan and the Upside-Down World of Bourgeois Fantasy Fiction

On 14 August 2021, one imperialist hack by the name of Daniel Hannan (Lord Hannan of Kingsclere, former Conservative Party MEP and current advisor to the UK Board of Trade), wrote an article in the Telegraph proclaiming black was white, up was down and right was wrong! The title of his anti-Soviet diatribe of crude fiction was titled The collapse of the USSR thirty years ago was a victory for nationhood over tyranny.” The collapse of the Soviet Union was not an overnight event that happened because everyone was drunk, it had been a long time in the making with traitors and Western spies pushing and working for it ever since the death of comrade Josef Stalin. Continue reading “Daniel Hannan and the Upside-Down World of Bourgeois Fantasy Fiction”

Soviet statues and the Superstitions of a Class in Terminal Decline

In the psyche of the modern imperialist mindset, there is often displayed a unique, often morbid fascination with Soviet era statues and monuments, especially when they can be found languishing in derelict or partly dismembered conditions. Writing in the Mail Online, Isabel Baldwin’s August 4th article “Spooky Stalins and Lonesome Lenins” covers a photo documentary exhibition currently being exhibited in Portland, Oregon, by American photographer Matthew Moore which perfectly encapsulates the superstitious and titillating nature of the bourgeois fixation with this theme. Continue reading “Soviet statues and the Superstitions of a Class in Terminal Decline”

Corporate workplace burn-out culture is no match for Socialist emulation

On 29 June 2021 the Conversation website published an essay entitled “How a Soviet miner from the 1930s helped create today’s intense corporate workplace culture”, co-authored by Bogdan Costea and Peter Watt, two academics from Lancaster University. In the essay, the authors strive to draw supposed parallels between the  destructive “corporate workplace culture” of present-day capitalism and the Stakhanov movement of the 1930s. Whilst their depiction of the dehumanising character of social relations under capitalism is spot-on, the attempt to paint social relations in the USSR with the same brush is a grotesque calumny which vanishes in a puff of air when exposed to the historical record. Continue reading “Corporate workplace burn-out culture is no match for Socialist emulation”